Tag Archive for 'Lighting'

Pro Photo Podcast #82. Christmas 2011

Click To Listen>>

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.


Direct Podcast FeediTunesPodcast Alley

Today’s Panel... Gavin Seim –  Barry Howel –  Dennis ZerwasBrady DillsworthJonathan Bielaski

On this years annual Christmas bash we we have fun talking about light, 2012, lots of great gadgets and gifts, and even avalanches… If you listen to the after show.

Podcast #82 forum discussions:

Main Time Indexes:

  • 03:30 News and Rumors.
  • 23:00 L Rounds – Light, 2012 Business..
  • 59:45 Talking Copyright.
  • 1:09:00 Selling Us.
  • 1:10:25 Picks of the Year.
  • 1:49:05 After Show 2011.

 

Links…

Is Adobe fleecing us again. Kelby writes them a letter.

Agency Access commercial PR like agency for photographers.

Johnathan’s personal portrait project, For The Love of It.

On photography. A video of Ken Whitmire.

Copyright info and tips for photographers.

If you’re going to imaging USA email Gavin, prophotoshow@gmail.com

PICKS. Lots of them.

Gavin, DSLR bot
Gavin, La Crosse Technology BC-700 charger.

Barry – hassy nikon mount.
DZ… Steam Fast fabric steamer for backdrops.
John… Bubble levelPro Gaff Gaffers Tape.

Brady. Lastolight Tri-grip reflector –  Lumiquest LTP hotshoe softbox.

Gavin… 126 LED light panel.

Barry… Rouge flash bender.

Continue reading ‘Pro Photo Podcast #82. Christmas 2011’

How to WindProof Your Lightstands (without sandbags):

by Gavin Seim: Attempting to setup light outside with an with an umbrella, softbox, or even a lone strobe can quickly turn into a fiasco of tipping. I have a family session with over forty people this weekend, and the last thing I want to worry about was whether my lights are secure. One common method is to use sandbags, but I wanted something small, light and adaptable to keep stands from falling over. Behold the DIY quick release cords for.

Direct YouTube link.

PS. The wind was not intense on the day I made this, but I left them up all afternoon without reservation. These make a VERY stable light and they should handle heavy winds if needed. Do some tests of your own and if in doubt just add a few extra tether cords to make it as sturdy as you need. Also here is a good video on how to tie the Tautline Hitch.

Naked Elements Textures
Sponsor:

Pro Photo Podcast #62RT, Lighting The Land:

Click To Listen>>

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.


Review in iTunes, or Vote on Podcast Alley

The Panel... Gavin SeimNeil Van NiekerkDennis ZerwasSam Gardner
This week we talk about the latest news then get into lighting tips, picks and chat.

Podcast #62 forum discussion:

Notable Time Indexes:

  • 00:00 Introductions and news.
  • 26:30 Canon 5D MK2 lens update.
  • 36:10 In Memory Of Grant Seim IV.
  • 38:21 Lets Talk About Lighting.
  • 1:27:50 The Picks.
  • 1:43:25 After Show (Wall Portraits & More)

Special fundraiser effects & HDR video set. Short link http://bit.ly/grant4

Continue reading ‘Pro Photo Podcast #62RT, Lighting The Land:’

50+ Twitter Length Photography Tips.

by Gavin Seim. Updated 05/2012:
I enjoy quick bursts of information and chat frequently as @gavinseim on twitter.  I’ve made this list of my favorite tips that I plan to update it going forward. You can add your favorite and tips in the comments with your twitter name. I might even RT them myself.

I give credit to the speaker when I can, using names in parenthesis. Many of these are my own musings from Twitter and I’ve indicated myself with an (S). If there’s no name then I probably don’t know the source. These are not always exact quotes, but ideas I’ve re-formed to fit in under 140 characters on Twitter

Random Things:

  • Every image needs a subject. Just one. If it has less or more, than that it’s probably time to reboot. (S)
  • Presentation is as much part of a photo as the image itself. An image on a disk means little to the world. A well presented wall piece does. (S)
  • Don’t wait for the photo establishment to show you how to stand out. Because if you do, you won’t (S)
  • The line between a snapshot and a quality photograph are lost when everyone is a “photographer” but have not actually learned to be one! (S)
  • I’m not afraid to change my opinion, but I am afraid of not having one. (S)
  • Competition. A powerful tool that makes you stronger. Complaints about it are often cop outs from photographers not motivated enough to excel (S)
  • In photography rules mean conformity, and to conform is the opposite of creativity. (Whitmire)
  • Be Positive. It’s not just a blood type. (S)
  • Each time I think I’m really good, I learn that I’m not as great as I thought. Then I actually start getting really good (S)
  • Always do the best you can with what you have, but always push yourself to the next level. (S)
  • As photographers we often overlook the power of just practicing. It’s like giving ourselves our own workshop for free. (S)
  • Photography is painting with light. So if light is paint, why do we spend more time pressing buttons than mixing our paint? (S)
  • It’s not the location you take your photos in. It’s the photos you take in your location. Anything can be a good background. (S)
  • Being edgy is cool until everyone is doing it. Then it’s not edgy. It’s just boring and usually annoying. (S)
  • Every really good photograph I manage to make is a class in making the next one. (S)

Posing n more:

  • Portraits. Guys tilt the head towards the low shoulder = macho. Girls tilt head towards high shoulder = pretty (Celentano)
  • Bridal Portraits, Hold that bouquet on the hip to look thinner. Hands (and bouquets) held in front from make the bride look bigger. (Celentano)
  • Group portrait. Just before the shot have everyone lift up their shoulders and lean towards the center. (Celentano)
  • Portrait Tip: Look for triangles in your group poses. Use bodies, sitting, head position etc to form triangles. (Celentano)
  • If posture pose and light is correct it does not matter where the camera sits. The pose is still set. (Gardener)
  • Posing tip: If it bends, bend it. Play around with joints, elbows, fingers, everything.
  • Posing tip: Leave some open space between those bent elbows and the waist. Helps make your subject slim n trim. (S)
  • Don’t over pose the subjects in your groups. Their not solders, their free people. (Whitmire)

 

Continue reading ’50+ Twitter Length Photography Tips.’

15 Tips for Wedding Photographers:

seim-wedding-caveb-photo-40-650x434

Get the essentials: Thinking outside the box works, Just remember to get the MUST have's. Walking down the isle, standing at the alter, the first dance and many more. What's important to each couple can vary, so communication is important.

Where to start, how to get there, how to stay there. Secrets for professional and aspiring wedding photographers from Gavin & others.

by Gavin Seim: How do I handle my first wedding? How do I become a pro? I get these type of questions fairly often. Weddings aren’t for everyone but most aspiring and pro photographers will photograph a wedding sometime in their career. There’s much to be learned from what’s demanded of us at a wedding. While this article is aimed at those getting started, seasoned pro’s will get ideas too.

Today I’ll give some I’ll talk the basics of how I see and think when I photograph a wedding. Tips 1-6 will focus on getting great images. Then we’ll talk a bit about a  post production and business (which is every bit as important). As we go thru them I’ll post some favorite images and share some thoughts.

The first wedding is daunting. Let me say that I won’t be talking about extreme photography basics in this article. If you’re at that stage there’s no shame in it, but you should gain some experience before tacking a wedding on your own. It’s a one time event and if you get it wrong you will be, at best, a sore spot in the eyes of your client. That’s not good for getting new clients and both you and your client deserve better.

If you can, second shoot aside an experienced photographer it’s a great way to learn, gain better portfolio and get more confidence. In my case that never happened. Though got serious about photography at age 12, my first wedding was cold turkey. I photographed for fun at a wedding and the couple loved them. That pushed me forward and my first paid wedding came awhile after. The rest is… Well the rest is below.

seim-wedding-caveb-photo-46-650x434

Try new things: This shot is the result of the first time I used off camera wireless flash (with Radio Poppers) at a wedding. I was just learning them, but made the choice to push myself to get great light in this scene. It paid off and my final image has a neat cinematic feel that fits my style.

Before my first wedding I absorbed the information in at least three wedding photography books. That helped me get a feel for what should happen. Without that study I would have missed a lot of important things. Resources like this are great (I wish I had had them) but a book can help you get perspective and have a reference to review. I’ll list few good books to get you rolling at the bottom of this post.

My first paid gig was back in the film days. I was about eighteen. Armed with my Canon EOS3, a cheap flash, a cheap zoom lens and an old monolight strobe handed down from Doug Miller, a real local pro, I became a wedding photographer. Was I good? No, but I was enthusiastic.

Continue reading ’15 Tips for Wedding Photographers:’